Is There a Natural, Non-Addictive, And Non-Anti-Reward, Safe, Open Access Gene-Based Solution to Treat Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS)? KB220 Variants Vs. GLP-1 Analogs

Edward Justin Modestino, Abdalla Bowirrat, David Baron, Panayotis K. Thanos, Colin Hanna, Debasis Bagchi, Eric R. Braverman, Catherine A. Dennen, Rajendra D. Badgaiyan, Aryeh R. Pollack, Kai-Uwe Lewandrowski, Alireza Sharafshah, Mark S. Gold and Kenneth Blum

 

Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) is an umbrella term encompassing a wide array of addictive behaviors that affect individuals across diverse spectra of society. Our research group has conducted a plethora of studies investigating the utilization of KB220 and its various iterations for addressing Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS), including: dopamine homeostasis, brain areas associated with dopamine, functional connectivity, qEEG, reductions of cravings, relapse prevention and detoxification, opioid-seeking and attenuation of intake, binge-drinking and withdrawal, DUIs, shopping and hoarding behaviors, memory decline, nightmares, paraphilias, ADHD, eating disorders and weight loss, anger and stress reduction, and genetically customized compounds. In this review, we compare studies using KB220 (and variants) for these things with GLP-1 analogs. We suggest that KB220 (and its variants) demonstrate superiority over GLP-1 analogs for addressing all these issues, as evidenced by various reasons outlined herein, particularly their impact on the brain’s reward cascade and dopamine homeostasis, all while avoiding antagonism of the reward system.

Published on: May 20, 2024
Citation: Modestino EJ, Bowirrat A, Baron D, Thanos PK, Hanna C, et al. 2024. Is There a Natural, Non-Addictive, And Non-Anti-Reward, Safe, Gene-Based Solution to Treat Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS)? KB220 Variants Vs. GLP-1 Analogs. J Addict Psychiatry 8(1): 34-49.

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